Don’t Be a Kidnapper!

Each spring, the Regina Humane Society receives many calls about “orphaned” wildlife or birds. While all have good intentions, disturbing the animals would likely do more harm than good.

Little Duck

If you encounter baby wildlife, please keep the following in mind:

  • If a young bird has fallen out of the nest, you may return it to the nest if it is immediate danger, but it is best to leave it alone. The mother will not reject the baby because you have touched it and babies usually fall out of the nest as a natural part of learning to fly;
  • If you find a young hare with no obvious injuries, leave it alone or put it back where it was found because the mother is likely nearby and will return once you leave. She will not reject it because you touched it;
  • Most young wild animals do very poorly in captivity. The best chance for their survival is to be reunited with their mother;
  • It is especially important to avoid contact with young raccoons and skunks because they can be carriers of rabies and parasites;
  • It is against the law to keep a wild animal.

We also receive calls regarding geese and other birds nesting in unusual places such as parking lots, fields or alleys. Unless the bird is injured, it is best to leave it be. While the location of the nest may seem unusual to us, they have chosen it based on their natural instincts and will very likely be just fine if left alone. If you are concerned about a young wild animal and an adult animal has not been seen for several days or the animal is injured, contact your local conservation officer, Salthaven West, or the Wascana Centre Authority if within the park, for assistance (please note that the RHS is not equipped to handle wildlife).

There is almost never a good reason to remove a young wild animal from its natural environment.